Another Surgery Down! Now, Recovering In So Many Ways (Post Surgery No.6)

Since my diagnosis in 2014, I’ve had some type of brain surgery…every… single… year with the exception of 2018. So, in 2019 just to make up for it, I guess, I had to get 2 “surgery notches” under my belt!

I’m now one week out from my 6th brain surgery. It was something termed a “Burrhole Craniotomy”. In real-people speak, I basically had a GPS-guided needle inserted into my skull to drain fluid from a lesion/cyst that sat in my brain for years caused by the insane amount of radiation I received between 2014 (initial diagnosis) and 2015 (recurrence). When I met with my neurosurgeon’s N.P. before he came in to discuss our options, I basically ticked-off every box for issues related to fluid in my brain. Yes, including being “ticked off” at everyone and everything. Yet, she asked politely, “Are you feeling more irritable?”. My husband had a good laugh at that one. We both answered with an emphatic “YES!”

Prior to the surgery, I became extremely angry and depressed. I never really had those feelings for such an extensive period without them being caused by some horrid med… ahem, Keppra, Dexamethasone. Nope. This time it was all me. Facing a 6th brain surgery, admittedly, gives me some leeway to feel so utterly miserable. I am only human after all.

I know full-well going to that “dark place” isn’t just damaging to my mental health, it makes me physically weak. I need to go into surgery healthy in all aspects-physically, mentally, emotionally, spiritually, etc. Yet, I couldn’t pull myself out of the darkness.

The one thing I was 100% confident in was my neurosurgeon. If I ever turn this into a book, I will absolutely name him. However, for now we will remain anonymous. I know for sure he truly lives and breathes by the Hippocratic Oath, most especially

  • the duty to “do the least harm”; and,
  • “there is art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon’s knife or the chemist’s drug.

Fortunately, I’ve made wonderful connections within the brain cancer community since my diagnosis. I have no doubt some of those connections are why I’m still here. They’ve led me into the exam rooms of some of the most impressive physicians in this country. My neurosurgeon is one of those people.

So, despite all my neurological issues, including losing total use of my left hand, falling on the daily, constantly losing my memory or at least feeling such brain fog I literally forgot the year, I knew my doc would get me through this. And he did.

Without getting into too much detail, I had consulted with another surgeon first. Wait, I actually wrote a whole post about that experience. Oh well… “blame brain cancer brain”Totally off topic – Can we stop saying, “oops! Must be Mommy brain!”? No, like I’m literally missing a part of my brain that was infected with cancer – twice. Then, it got lots and lots of radiation beamed into it. We just forget shit! Mommies, don’t hate me, please.)

So, that other surgeon had proposed a much more invasive surgery. I was incredibly uncomfortable with his plan. I was very open that I was going for another consult at another hospital. The hospitals in NYC seem to compete with one another like spoiled school girls. I’m not too too concerned with that B.S. I’m trusting my brain with whoever is going to stick by that whole “least harm” idea.

My surgeon utilized the least invasive means possible, I only spent one night in the hospital. My left hand is working again. I’m walking better. The brain fog is still around, but I’ve been on Percocet the last few days. I’m not quite so “irritable “. My husband is very happy about that! I’ve got another surgery notch under my belt. Thankfully, I’m finding myself again too.

What’s a “Bur Hole” Anyway? (Surgery No. 6)

There are a ridiculous amount of medical terms you learn as a cancer patient.

There are about 130 different types of brain tumors alone. Never mind having to learn about the areas of the brain the tumor may affect, then what part of the body that area of the brain it controls, and on and on. I practically feel like we, as cancer patients, should be awarded medical degrees!

As an attorney, so much of my job involved research. Since my diagnosis nearly 6 years ago now, I raise issues with my doctors to the reply of, “Oh, that’s a very good point.” I’ve sent my doctors articles about new research, trials and information they admittedly were not aware of prior to me bringing it to their attention.

Yet, after receiving my discharge papers following my sixth surgery, I learned a whole new phrase, “bur hole craniotomy”!

Obviously, prior to the procedure I knew what I was going in for – a needle was going to be inserted into my brain to drain the lesion/cyst in my head that’s constantly filling with fluid, causing swelling and pressure to build up in my brain. That pressure then causes me to lose my balance and fall, causes unbearable fatigue, increases my seizures and makes me a prisoner because I cannot leave my home safely.

On December 5th, I underwent the procedure. Immediately after, I felt great. I regained use of my left hand. I walked around without my wretched cane. However, I experienced and am still battling intense migraines. The recovery was short-lived because the fluid has returned.

And I’m Out! Back Home, But Boy Does Reality Bite

It’s pretty surreal being back home after my 7th brain surgery, a full week in ICU and then 2 1/2 weeks in acute, inpatient rehabilitation. It was strangely very bittersweet leaving rehab, where I had a very set schedule, was taken care of so wonderfully and most importantly, able to remove myself from reality. As the fantastic ‘90s movie says, “Reality Bites”.

Room With A View

View from my window at inpatient rehabilitation.

When I was initially told I’d be in acute rehab for more than 2 weeks, I had a pure and utter meltdown. I couldn’t imagine being cooped-up for that long without my husband, my dog, my own bed, any semblance of privacy, and on and on. Ugly tears everywhere! So many, many ugly tears

Yet, now that I’m out and back home, I feel completely overwhelmed. Piles of mail sat on my desk. Things weren’t in their “proper place”. (I’m no neat-freak but I’m very Type A when it comes to where things are placed, kept, etc. I don’t know, blame my parents… 🤔🤷🏻‍♀️) I had to make countless follow-up appointments. I had to call the apartment management because yet again, some dirtbag threw their cigarette butt onto our terrace. My darling husband fell for one of the easiest scams ever, and the laptop only I use got hacked. I not-so kindly asked him if I could introduce him to a Nigerian Prince.

Then came the real kicker! I received a letter from a debt collection law firm (the lowest of the low on the attorney food chain) threatening to file suit against ME because the home healthcare agency I was forced to use back in 2018 never paid the company THEY contracted with to give me home PT & OT. ***If you are reading this and are a debt collection attorney, I make no apologies. As an attorney myself, I’d rather chase ambulances***

Well, that of course set up a whole chain of phone calls to my insurance, my family attorney and the law firm threatening suit. Then, I proceeded to look back on all my prior correspondence with the home healthcare agency and the company seeking to sue me because they hadn’t been paid. Finally, I wrote a lengthy email to all parties, copying my attorney, having to “make my case” in writing how I was in no way responsible for this money, threatening to sue the firm for harassment, and underscoring that the Court wouldn’t look too favorably upon some firm trying to make a recovering cancer survivor pay almost $5,000 because their client signed a contract with a less-than reputable home healthcare agency.

So, yeah, reality really f***in’ bites! While I imagined coming home would be so joyous and relaxing, it’s been anything but relaxing. Who leaves the hospital after nearly one month and actually wants to go back???

For anyone who has never seen this movie, you’re missing out!
The good old grungy 1990’s

I know things will settle down, and I’m being a bit dramatic. My fellow patients I met during my stay, who will remain hospitalized for some time would probably kick me for wishing I was back there. However, there’s something very distressing about returning home, no longer just one “call bell” away from help. I was so fortunate to have been in such a top-notch facility. There was always someone to talk to, who understood everything I was going through. Whether it was a social worker, a therapist, a nurse or fellow patient-someone was constantly there to support me. They were right there in the trenches with me, and there wasn’t ANYTHING those nurses, aides, or doctors hadn’t seen or heard before. It was a total judgment free zone.

So, now I’m out. I’m back to the real world. Maybe I just need to chill out on my couch with some friends, puff a lil of my medicinal med not permitted in the hospital, go grab snacks at a gas station and start dancing to some cheesy music. (If you’ve seen the movie, you’ll get the reference)

They Tried To Make Me Go To Rehab… And I Go, Go, Go

After a week in ICU following my 7th brain surgery, I was sent to inpatient acute rehab. Since they seriously work me here, this won’t be a long, deeply reflective post. I’m definitely “on the go” constantly here.

Nevertheless, I did think it was important to post about my experience thus far.

This is actually my 2nd stint in an acute rehab facility. In fact, back in 2017 when I had to be transferred to an inpatient rehabilitation facility my doctors tried to get me into this particular rehab. Unfortunately, there were no beds available and thus, I wound up in a very good facility. However, it’s nothing like this experience!

I’d say I’m currently in the “creme de la creme” of neurological rehab facilities. It’s pretty rare to have absolutely NO complaints about a healthcare facility these days. Yet, I don’t have a single issue and can only sing the praises of every single staff member. From the doctors to the men who clean the floors, everyone is truly amazing.

I’ve been here for two weeks now, and have another half week ahead of me. Okay. I am getting a bit tired of the same food options, but if that’s my only gripe-that’s pretty darn fantastic!

Before this last surgery, I could barely walk. I was in constant fear of falling, and for good reason. I was basically falling every day. I had no balance. I slept until noon, on good days! My body was so fatigued it took every once of energy to simply get out of bed. Then, I’d merely move to my couch. Let’s just say I blew through countless Netflix movies and series. Around 8:00 p.m. I’d be asking my husband to bring me back into the bedroom. I’d take a quick shower or bath, and I was done.

My day here includes:

•Wake up at 8:00 a.m. & eat breakfast

•Start physical therapy around 10 p.m. and work on balance exercises, walking with and without my cane (Yes!), using the treadmill, walking along the unit, etc.

•Speech/Cognitive therapy immediately afterward

•Lunch at noon

•Then, occupational therapy where I work out my weakened left arm through stretches and a state-of-the-art robot that measures my range of motion. It’s pretty cool, I have to say. We also work on “Activities of Daily Living” (ADLs) like how to step into the shower safely, cooking a meal or doing laundry. Now, I’m doing squats to pick things up and not dropping everything I put in my hand.

•Once my standard therapies are over, I can join a gym class, go to art therapy, and/or horticultural therapy (potting an array of beautiful plants and learning how to care for them).

I can achieve all of this before 4:00 p.m.! Prior to this surgery, I was barely able to function never mind participating in so many amazing activities before the sun goes down.

I’d never imagine eating dinner at 4:45, but it’s the early early bird special here!

By the time I finish dinner, it’s time to shower-up and start getting ready for bed. Who knows? Maybe this night owl just may learn to become an early bird… Realistically though, probably not.

It’s amazing what these dedicated professionals can do for people like me with such extreme neurologic deficits. It’s even more fascinating what they do for people much worse-off than me.

The brain is truly an incredible thing.

“Lucky Number 7”, or At Least I Hope So

As I write this, I’m laying here in ICU…Still. Thankfully, it’s not an isolated ICU, so friends and family can come and go. Most importantly my husband is allowed to be here everyday, so the days go by much quicker than the evenings. My “estimated” hospital stay of 1-2 days following surgery No. 7 is currently on Day 7 with a “possible discharge to acute rehab tomorrow”. However, I’ve been hearing this for quite a few days now. Unfortunately with my case, this is no surprise.

It’s a natural question to ask, “How long will you be in the hospital?” However, I have learned the hard way to take that “estimated” time period with a complete grain of salt. It’s NEVER what they estimate!

Something always seems to happen; be it a simple revision of my skin graft (Surgery No. 4) when they unexpectedly found 3 separate bacteria in my skull bone, and what was only meant to be a one-night stay turned into a full week vs. when I was released the same night after they removed a small part of my skull that was totally unconnected to the rest of my skull and excised a wound on my scalp (Surgery No. 5).

So, here I am, alive but not so well, after Surgery No. 7.

Yes. I thank God I’m alive, and that I’m coherent enough to even say that. I recall most details of my other surgeries. However, all I can recall from the first few days after this surgery was the horrific, excruciating pain. Mostly I was in and out of a painkiller haze. Yet, when I was actually awake, the slightest movement caused intense, shooting pains throughout my entire body. Now, this chick has got a serious threshold for pain! So, when they asked, “On a scale of 1 to 10, how would you rate the pain?” and I could merely moan, “10” – you’ve got to understand just how severe this pain was.

Without getting into all the complexities of this 7th Surgery, I had a “shunt” or catheter placed into the area of my brain, where the tumors were removed and the radiation was beamed into where fluid would consistently flow. The fluid would sometimes cause increased swelling and thus, pressure in my brain. Now, with the shunt in place, the fluid will hopefully continuously flow out of the brain and be absorbed into the rest of my body. Science! It’s fascinating when you’re not the guinea pig.

I’ll have this shunt inside my body for as long as it holds up. It could be years, months. Again, who knows?

What I do know is that this has been one of the toughest, if not THE toughest surgeries so far. So, I hope and I pray that this will be Lucky Number 7 and I won’t have to see another Operating Room for a very, very long time.

In the Clear! And, the “New Normal”

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In my prior post “Vacation Period?” Seriously…, I described the traumatic period between my last radiation treatment and my follow-up MRI.  Well, the day of reckoning had come – the MRI results were in.  ALL CLEAR!  No sign of cancer!

Without a doubt, I was indescribably relieved.  I cried tears of overwhelming joy.  That metaphorical tons of bricks weighing on my shoulders immediately lifted.  It was almost surreal.

Once my oncologist sat down with me celebrating the incredible news, we got to another topic… the emotional turmoil of those weeks leading up the MRI.  She knew full-well what I had been going through, thanks to multiple calls to her office.  Even with the clear MRI, she knew I needed help to process all of this.  So, she recommended several things, including seeing a therapist, as well as a psychiatrist for an evaluation to determine if I
needed medication to ease the anxiety that had overcome me during that period of time.

I had never been in therapy.  I was of the strong opinion that here in the U.S., we were over-medicating ourselves with antidepressants and drugs of all sorts.  I’ll be honest – I was against it all.  However, she felt that it was almost a “prescription” to seek out professional help within the hospital’s incredible counseling center.  So, because I literally trusted her and all of my doctors with my life, with much hesitation, I agreed.

Additionally, she suggested reaching out to the hospital’s social worker, who specifically dealt with neurology patients and particularly brain cancer patients.  I had an easier time agreeing to that idea.  It seemed a lot less clinical.  As it turns out, the social worker pointed me to some really great cancer organizations, particularly First Descents (http://firstdescents.org/).

During the dark period, it also hadn’t helped that I had been on a seizure medication known to have terrible side effects regarding anxiety/depression in some patients.  So, with the clear MRI, my seizure doctor was comfortable taking me off that medication and replacing it with another drug.  Changing that medication made a world of difference for my mental state.

Going back to the time period between my surgery and throughout my radiation period (approximately 6 months after my inital diagosis), I had actually been extremely positive and strong.  I had become heavily involved in the National Brain Tumor Society (www.braintumor.org).  I had also just signed-up for a post-treatment support group through CancerCare (http://www.cancercare.org/).  So, I will say I was fortunate that the dark period only truly lasted those several weeks before the MRI.  Now, with the news the MRI was clear, boy, did my whole outlook change!  I went back, almost immediately, to that fighter/survivor, who people had truly been amazed by.  People had called me an “inspiration” (discussed in my post https://braincancerbabe.com/2016/04/19/being-an-inspiration/) and yeah, I felt that way again.

So, life began to quickly normalize again.  I felt happy.  I felt strong.  I felt positive.  I truly felt that everything was going to be okay.  Of course, the fear of a recurrence remained in the back of my mind, but it didn’t dominate my thoughts.  I was meeting so many other survivors and realizing, “Hey.  I’m not alone in all of this.  Other people actually felt the same way I did!  This was NOT a death sentence”  I went back to work, part-time.  Although, I still hated my job and actually regret going back so soon.  I did see the therapist and set up a regular schedule of appointments.  The psychiatrist, thankfully, deemed that I did not need antidepressants.  Life felt good again.  It felt really, really good.

While yes, life did normalize, it was indeed my “new normal.”  I felt comfortable with the fact that cancer had changed my whole world, but it wasn’t all for the worse.  I truly embraced a new perspective on life, namely, “Live every minute of every day like it’s your last!  Appreciate everything you have!”

I saw how lucky I was to have come out of all of this with very, very few side effects.  I was doing pretty much everything I had been doing before cancer entered my world.  I mean, seriously – I had had brain cancer and brain surgery!  Yet, here I was, pretty much the same girl I had been.  I truly recognized what an amazing support system I had.  The kindness, concern and love from even strangers overwhelmed me.  Man, was I loved!

I continued to be monitored very closely by my neurology team.  At every visit, they were beyond thrilled that the dark days were behind me (which I now see as a very brief period of time in the grand scheme of things).  They loved seeing that girl they had first met, who showed what a fighter she was and how she continued to embrace life so much.

I was kickin’ ass.

However, things did change in early 2015.  So, that will lead to my next post and specifically, Round 2 of the cancer chaos.

 

 

So, you’re going to radiate my brain????

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Following my initial brain surgery in April 2014, it took time to come up with the further “treatment plan.”  Given that I am so fortunate (insert sarcasm here), my tumor, an anaplastic ependymoma, is extremely rare.

All of my factors also played into how rare it was:

1.)  It was a primary tumor in my brain –  typically, my type appeared in the spinal cord and remained there,  or it would metastasize to the brain; there was absolutely no trace of cancer in my spine (confirmed through spinal taps – oh my god, the pain!)

2.)  My tumor is considered a childhood/pediatric cancer, so it is rare to find it in adults (some statistics show that only approximately 70 adults in the U.S. are diagnosed with a malignant, primary brain ependymoma every year.)

3.)  There are extremely limited studies regarding ependymomas, given how rare they are.  Thus, treatment options are basically – surgery, and/or radiation and/or maybe chemo.  Yet, the few studies showed that combining radiation and chemo didn’t make much difference, if any.  Thus, radiation was the standard protocol following surgery

4.)  My surgery resulted in a total resection of the tumor.  Thus, I was “technically” cancer-free, for whatever that was worth…

[DISCLAIMER:  This information is NOT meant to be taken as medical advice or gospel.  https://cern-foundation.org/ is the primary source for information on ependymomas)

So, following my surgery, I met my amazing “team” of doctors.  They are a god-send and I am literally thankful every single day for them.  My “team” consisted of my neurosurgeon, neuro-oncologist, seizure neurologist and radiation oncologist.  This didn’t even include the numerous doctors, who served on my hospital’s tumor board and studied my case alongside my primary doctors.

Together, my team came up with the plan – I would undergo 6 weeks of radiation (30 sessions 5 days a week) and no chemo.  I didn’t really think twice about it.  What other choice did I have?  I trusted all of these doctors.  I was being treated at one of the top cancer hospitals in the country.  Plus, there was really no other studies/information to show any alternative treatment.

Of course though, the idea of actually radiating my brain sounded insane!  Um, weren’t we all taught throughout our lives that radiation was a really, really bad thing?  Ex. “Don’t stand in front of the microwave!  Radiation!”  However, I don’t recall even asking that many questions.  I knew the really basic, possible side effects – swelling on my brain, fatigue, hair loss, etc.  So, I just kind of casually decided, “Okay, let’s do it.”

One of the most disturbing experiences regarding the radiation was the mask.  For those who don’t know, in order to radiate the brain, a patient needs to undergo a simulation.  Amongst other things, that involves forming a mesh mask to be placed on your face and around your head.  The mask would then be strapped down to the radiation table during your treatment.  It is so sci-fi I cannot even describe.  It is scary.  It is beyond uncomfortable.  It creates such pressure around your entire face and head.  Sometimes, it felt like I couldn’t breath properly or swallow.  I hated it.

I know some patients actually keep their masks.  I literally never looked at my mask.  I refused.  So, obviously I did not keep mine.

And so, I spent the first 6 weeks of my summer traveling 5 days a week to have my brain radiated.  The treatment itself never hurt.  It actually became very routine.  It was just a part of my day.

One of the most difficult parts came when I began to lose my hair from the radiation.  I never ever thought it would affect me so much.  Sitting on my couch, running my hands through my hair and holding clumps of it was overwhelming.  I cried – a lot.  I needed to get a hair piece, but I hadn’t actually lost enough to need a full wig.  When I sat down at the hair piece consult, I absolutely lost it.  I could not stop crying.  I guess it was one of the first physical signs that demonstrated, “Yes, you are actually a cancer patient.”  Frankly, I just didn’t look sick, or what we imagine a cancer patient is supposed to look like.  Yet this – this was an unquestionable physical sign that radiation was indeed entering my brain and causing side effects.  I was indeed a cancer patient.

Another side effect I wasn’t totally prepared for, despite being told over and over about it, was the fatigue.  It didn’t hit me as hard as I know it does some patients.  I literally went to my radiation sessions every day by myself on the bus and subway, which people were surprised by.  I made sure I walked every day.  I attended my PT sessions two to three times a week.  However, it took every ounce of my strength, both mentally and physically, to fight that fatigue.  Trust me, it isn’t just being tired.  It is a full body exhaustion.  However, as I was told over and over again, the best way to fight the fatigue was to basically, just fight through it.  So, I did.

I also spent a lot of time with friends and family enjoying summer as best I could.  I took a LOT of advantage of a friend’s pool.  I lounged on the beach as much as possible.  I laid out in the sun and read a lot.  I made sure I kept up my social life, although I obviously wasn’t frequenting the bars until 1:00 a.m.  I mean, for the first time in my life since my teens, I wasn’t working.  I was sure as hell going to take advantage of that!!!

So, after those 30 radiation sessions ended, my doctors advised that I would undergo my next scan in approximately a month to 6 weeks later.  I am still bitter and angry about this, but they called this my “vacation period.”  I wasn’t in treatment, so this was the time to rest and take advantage of my “vacation” from radiation.  It’s insulting to call it that.

My next post on the topic of Round 1 of my cancer life will go into the details of this “vacation period.”  Needless to say, it was NO vacation!

 

The First Signs…I Totally Ignored

The First Signs…I Totally Ignored

I can’t specifically pinpoint when the strange sensations in my left leg began, but I recall a distinct moment in late January when I felt something was off.  To celebrate my 34th birthday, I planned a great getaway with some of my best girlfriends and my poor husband (the only male surrounded by 5 women is never easy).  We spent days on the beach in the Caribbean, sipping beers and frozen drinks.  We went dancing every night, so much that all of us came back with sore feet.  We ate fantastic food.  It was one of the best trips, filled with so much fun, joy and love.

One of those days, a few of us began walking the beach, hilariously to the end where the nudist resort began – just for shits and giggles.  However, less than halfway through the walk I had to stop due to that sensation in my left foot and leg.  I causally commented that it had been happening for a little while, but frankly I didn’t take it seriously whatsoever.

 As the early months of 2014 continued, the episodes came more often and they grew more intense.  I remember walking down the streets of Manhattan and having to stop until the feeling subsided.  My left foot would essentially become numb with the electrical-type sensations traveling all the way up my leg.  I recall sitting at my desk while they started to come multiple times a day.  It no longer mattered whether I was walking, sitting or laying down.

I know there were a few episodes, but one particular time while working out on an ellipitical machine the sensation wasn’t just isolated to my leg.  This time, it traveled all the way up my left side into my face.  I honestly thought I had just been working out too hard, but this episode did scare me.

So, by Thursday, April 3rd, I finally saw my primary care physician.  Due to a history of multiple sclerosis in my family, my doctor was concerned.  She wanted a brain MRI and blood tests.  I was devastated by the thought of an MS diagnosis.  I had seen what it did to my aunt over all these years.  I just couldn’t imagine it.

I went to my parent’s house immediately.  I was crying when I first saw my father and explained what my doctor had advised.  He was floored, but directed me to keep it from my mother.  Obviously, she had also seen what MS had done to her sister and our family.  My father did not want her to know anything until something, whatever that something was, could be confirmed.  I won’t lie.  That was TOUGH.

On Saturday, April 5th, I went in for the blood tests, but didn’t receive any results.  Those would take days.  The MRI had yet to be scheduled – insurance holdups of course.  Needless to say, it was not the best weekend.

And so, Sunday, April 6th, in an attempt to relieve all of the stress, I went to relax and get my nails done.  My world would never be the same.

The history of my seizure that day is detailed in my post.

https://braincancerbabe.com/2016/05/17/having-a-seizure/

Following my diagnosis, I learned that the episodes had been seizures and clearly, there was no question about the “big daddy” grandmal seizure.  However, there had never been any other symptoms I could pinpoint to have led me to even fathom cancer.  I never had headaches, blurred vision or issues with my speech.

No one prepares for brain cancer.  I can’t imagine anyone even suspects it despite clear symptoms.  I never really even knew about brain cancer.  No one ever really talked about it.  No one publicized the symptoms or what to look out for.  (As an aside, these are the reasons I tirelessly work to raise funds and awareness for brain cancer).

I wish I had known the symptoms and more knowledge of this disease.  Quite possibly, it could have pushed me into that doctor’s office much earlier.

cancer-symptoms-not-to-avoid

Post-Op and the Dreaded Neuro-Observation Area

Post-Op

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I woke up in the post-op room, but I don’t remember feeling any pain whatsoever.  Frankly, I felt high as a kite!  Those were some gooood meds!  My whole family was shocked because I was wide awake, cracking jokes and acting as though everything was fine.  My surgeon came back to see me and I continued to joke telling him, “I’ve had worse hangovers!”  (My relationship with my neurosurgeon has always been light and sarcastic, which I love)

The nurse eventually told my family I needed to rest and once they left, I don’t remember much of that post-op room except for feeling strangely comfortable there.  (Again, they were some gooood meds!)

Post-Op Neuro-Observation

It was when they moved me to the neuro-observation room that hell broke loose.  The meds began to ware off.  I could feel the intense pressure of the awful gauze turban.  (I HATE that thing)  It was also nighttime.  I had a horrible fear of nighttime/bedtime suffering from years and years of insomnia.  I also had new nurses, who I particularly didn’t like much.  It was dark in there.  I was closed off in my own little section, curtained between three other patients who themselves had just survived brain surgery.  It was not a pleasant space.

The worst came when they advised I would have to undergo a post-op MRI.  It was then I suffered the first panic attack of my life.  I’ll be honest.  Looking back, the nurse and the nurse’s assistant did not handle it well.  The nurse said in a slightly obnoxious tone, “She’s having some sort of panic attack.”  The nurse’s assistant, a very large and aggressive woman, held me down.  Kindly, they at least IVed some meds and I did calm down.

Thankfully, and because my neurosurgeon is A-mazing, there was a total resection of the tumor.  I was technically “cancer free” which is a term I still don’t apply to myself even now.

Although I understand it and accept it now through therapy, my husband refused to stay with me that night.  Was it the best, kindest thing to do?  No.  Did he handle it well?  No.  However, I forgive him.  It was all just too overwhelming for us.

So, after he left, the second panic attack of my life came on.  I don’t remember much of it or how the nurse handled that one, but I know it happened.  Maybe I’ve blocked it out, for good reason.

Eventually, it came time to leave that dreaded area.  I hate that I’ve returned there two more times since.

Operation Day and the Surgery

Operation Day!

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I vaguely remember waking up that morning, getting to the hospital and walking onto the surgical reception floor.  I also vaguely remember, practically whispering, “I am here for surgery.”  I waited in the reception area with my husband and parents before they called me back.  My mother would not sit still.  So, I was the one who kept having to calm her down, never mind that I was the one facing surgery.

I was the first scheduled case, so there wasn’t too much time before they called my name.  I walked into a whole new world.  The pre-op room was huge with lines of curtained-off beds.  Could all of these people seriously be going into surgery this morning?  I felt very lucky to have a nurse from Ireland.  It led to easy-going conversation about what parts of Ireland we were all from, and what brought us all to the States.  It helped me forget just a bit where I was and what I was facing.  However, I stayed very quiet.

At that point, I was still scared of needles and IVs (oh, how times change!).  So, they were not fun.  The anesthesiologist came back to talk to me.  He was also comforting and calmed me as best he could.  However, when the moment came to send me into the operating room, I completely and utterly lost it.  I was hysterically crying and found it hard to breathe.  The nurse immediately told the anesthesiologist that they needed to IV some meds ASAP.  It probably wasn’t a good idea to send a patient into the operating room like that.

The meds did work fast, thankfully.  However, I remember being wheeled down the hall and into the vortex of the operating room.  I could hear the MRI machine, as it was yet a noise I was used to – oh, that would come with time.  I stared up at all of the fluorescent lights.  I saw numerous people hurriedly walking around in scrubs.  Then, I saw the anesthesiologist looking down on me.  He asked me to start counting, but I think I got to about the third number before I lost consciousness.

The Surgery

Obviously, I remember nothing of the actual surgery.  That’s surely a blessing, as I’ve heard some patients actually do recall slight moments.  As far as I understand, they used a twilight anesthesia so that they could test my neurological functions with the MRI.  I vaguely remember it coming up, but I can’t confirm that at this moment, nor do I really want to.

So, I underwent a 3-hour craniotomy, defined as “a surgical operation in which a bone flap is temporarily removed from the skull to access the brain.”  The entire tumor was removed, referred to as “full resection.”  A titanium plate was placed in the area and I was then all stitched up.  They placed an awful, horrible gauze turban around my head to prevent swelling.  Amazingly, just a line of hair was shaved, so it was barely noticeable once the turban was removed.  (Getting that turban removed after 3 full days was an incredible physical and mental release).  Then it was off to the post-op recovery room, where I would remain for several hours.