Excellent Piece: “Elijah McClain Could Have Been My Brother”

Please read this excellent piece by a talented, impressive young woman of color, who lived in Aurora, Colorado. See the world through her eyes, and as she writes this article, also see the world through her brother’s eyes.

The author Alexandra Robinson graduated from the University of Maryland in 2019. She was one of two speechwriters for presidential candidate, Tom Steyer. She has a love of politics (God Bless you, girl. I did too at your age). She says that she wants to “continue on my journey of helping the American people.”

We need you, Alexandra Robinson! We really, really do!

Elijah McClain Could Have Been My Brother by Alexandra Robinson

https://blavity.com/elijah-mcclain-could-have-been-my-brother?category1=opinion

My sweet, talented, funny brother could have been just as easily taken away from this world without a trace and not talked about until months later.

Follow her: @alexlenee

They Tried To Make Me Go To Rehab… And I Go, Go, Go

After a week in ICU following my 7th brain surgery, I was sent to inpatient acute rehab. Since they seriously work me here, this won’t be a long, deeply reflective post. I’m definitely “on the go” constantly here.

Nevertheless, I did think it was important to post about my experience thus far.

This is actually my 2nd stint in an acute rehab facility. In fact, back in 2017 when I had to be transferred to an inpatient rehabilitation facility my doctors tried to get me into this particular rehab. Unfortunately, there were no beds available and thus, I wound up in a very good facility. However, it’s nothing like this experience!

I’d say I’m currently in the “creme de la creme” of neurological rehab facilities. It’s pretty rare to have absolutely NO complaints about a healthcare facility these days. Yet, I don’t have a single issue and can only sing the praises of every single staff member. From the doctors to the men who clean the floors, everyone is truly amazing.

I’ve been here for two weeks now, and have another half week ahead of me. Okay. I am getting a bit tired of the same food options, but if that’s my only gripe-that’s pretty darn fantastic!

Before this last surgery, I could barely walk. I was in constant fear of falling, and for good reason. I was basically falling every day. I had no balance. I slept until noon, on good days! My body was so fatigued it took every once of energy to simply get out of bed. Then, I’d merely move to my couch. Let’s just say I blew through countless Netflix movies and series. Around 8:00 p.m. I’d be asking my husband to bring me back into the bedroom. I’d take a quick shower or bath, and I was done.

My day here includes:

•Wake up at 8:00 a.m. & eat breakfast

•Start physical therapy around 10 p.m. and work on balance exercises, walking with and without my cane (Yes!), using the treadmill, walking along the unit, etc.

•Speech/Cognitive therapy immediately afterward

•Lunch at noon

•Then, occupational therapy where I work out my weakened left arm through stretches and a state-of-the-art robot that measures my range of motion. It’s pretty cool, I have to say. We also work on “Activities of Daily Living” (ADLs) like how to step into the shower safely, cooking a meal or doing laundry. Now, I’m doing squats to pick things up and not dropping everything I put in my hand.

•Once my standard therapies are over, I can join a gym class, go to art therapy, and/or horticultural therapy (potting an array of beautiful plants and learning how to care for them).

I can achieve all of this before 4:00 p.m.! Prior to this surgery, I was barely able to function never mind participating in so many amazing activities before the sun goes down.

I’d never imagine eating dinner at 4:45, but it’s the early early bird special here!

By the time I finish dinner, it’s time to shower-up and start getting ready for bed. Who knows? Maybe this night owl just may learn to become an early bird… Realistically though, probably not.

It’s amazing what these dedicated professionals can do for people like me with such extreme neurologic deficits. It’s even more fascinating what they do for people much worse-off than me.

The brain is truly an incredible thing.